Monday, March 22, 2021

The Rolex Submariner

 





The ROLEX SUBMARINER

The COOLEST WATCH AROUND


Since its introduction in 1953, the Rolex Submariner has in many ways defined not only the dive watch category, but the sport watch category more broadly. When you say "wristwatch" I think a large percentage of people picture something similar to a Rolex Submariner in their heads, whether they know why or not. The Sub has been worn by world luminaries, icons of the silver screen, sports legends, and basically any other set of noteworthy people you can name. The very notion of a black-dialed stainless steel watch with a rotating timing bezel, luminous hands, and a comfortable bracelet was broadly popularized by the Submariner.

Despite all of that though, the Submariner is an often-misunderstood watch. There have been well over a dozen distinct references of the Submariner, with up to a few hundred total variants depending on how thinly you want to start sub-dividing individual references based on dial text, lume plots, and more. We thought it was about time that we break things down and make the whole range of Submariners a little easier to understand. As you'd expect though, we had to set some boundaries for ourselves: We are only covering vintage Submariners here, starting with the first proper 1953 Submariner and working our way up through the last of the classic ref. 5513 Submariner. All of the watches here have four-digit reference numbers and acrylic crystals. Once we get into five-digit reference numbers, sapphire crystals, and other technical innovations, Rolex Submariner was among the very first dive watches on the market and it quickly became the most iconic. The Sub represents a sort of inflection point for Rolex as a company and how it would go on to become what it is today. Prior to the 1950s, Rolex was making mostly watches that today we'd describe as dress watches or all-purpose watches of one kind or another. Bubblebacks, two-register chronographs, and Datejusts were the brand's core offerings. Yes, these included important innovations like the waterproof Oyster case and the so-called "perpetual" automatic movements, but they weren't proper sport watches as we'd recognize them today. 




The SUBMARINER



The Rolex Submariner was among the very first dive watches on the market and it quickly became the most iconic. The Sub represents a sort of inflection point for Rolex as a company and how it would go on to become what it is today. Prior to the 1950s, Rolex was making mostly watches that today we'd describe as dress watches or all-purpose watches of one kind or another. Bubblebacks, two-register chronographs, and Datejusts were the brand's core offerings. Yes, these included important innovations like the waterproof Oyster case and the so-called "perpetual" automatic movements, but they weren't proper sport watches as we'd recognize them today. 





ISN'T IT TIME ?




Or Do WANT The GMT MASTER II ?





Rolex GMT-Master II (116710LN) self-winding automatic watch features a 40mm stainless steel case surrounding a black dial on a stainless steel Oyster bracelet with folding buckle. Functions include hours minutes seconds date and GMT. This watch comes complete with box and papers. G Serial. We back this watch with a 2-Year WatchBox warranty!     No name in the watch world approaches the stature of Rolex. Literally a synonym for quality and a household name that transcends the watch industry Rolex is both an impeccable manufacture of segment-leading products and an article of international pop culture. Owned and operated by a non-profit foundation Rolex has no need to chase fads or follow trends. Rolex watches are defined by enduring design relentless refinement and rejection of planned obsolescence. The company’s legendary models include the Datejust Submariner Day-Date GMT-Master II Explorer and Cosmograph Daytona.








POSITANO 

The AMALFI COAST










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relates to What’s So Special About a Rolex Submariner? Glad You Asked
Source: Hodinkee
All of that started to change as the '40s tuned into the '50s. The earliest Rolex Explorer models made their way to the summit of Everest (you can see the original right here, in fact) and the brand began experimenting with a new kind of design language that would come to dominate its offerings over the next decade. White and silver dials turned to black, lume plots got much bigger and started standing in for applied hour markers, cases startedwe get into squarely modern watches, which are a tale for another


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